ubxmldict

NAME

ubxmldict – make a data dictionary from xml definitions

SYNOPSIS

ubxmldict

DESCRIPTION

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubupdate

NAME

ubupdate – update tables from commands

SYNOPSIS

ubupdate <application>

DESCRIPTION

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubtabfix

NAME

ubtabfix – automated table check and fix routine

SYNOPSIS

DESCRIPTION

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubspreadsheet

NAME

ubspreadsheet – turn xml intp a spreadsheet

SYNOPSIS

DESCRIPTION

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubprint_form

NAME

ubprint_form – save and manipulate forms

SYNOPSIS

DESCRIPTION

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubprint

NAME

ubprint – print text with attributes

SYNOPSIS

ubprint -[P* a* d f* p* rate# r t* wp z] <files>

DESCRIPTION

ubprint reads files and prints them with embedded attributes for display or printing. ubprint recognises two command structures ‘.’ commands (lines starting with ‘.’) and ‘@@’ attributes (lines ending with ‘@@’ are followed by a line of codes). Text is passed through otherwise unchanged.

Printer attributes are stored in separate files per printer in the directory ‘/usr/lib/ub/printers’. While this is a break with the rest of UNIBASE which uses terminfo, it is necessary because some printers output ‘\0’ as part of the control commands and terminfo cannot store strings with embedded ‘\0’.

The format of the printer files can be found in printers(4). How to use attributes is also described in printers(4).

<P> <TABLE WIDTH=”100%” BGCOLOR=”#000000″> <CAPTION>COMMAND LINE OPTIONS</CAPTION> <TR><TD> <TABLE WIDTH=”100%” BGCOLOR=”#FFFFFF”> <TR> <TH>OPTION</TH> <TH>DESCRIPTION</TH> </TR> <TR> <TD>-a attribute</TD> <TD> The string to cause the printer to change attributes to attribute is output immediately. This cannot be used in conjunction with the file printing. It is analogous to the tput(1) commpand for terminals. <P> e.g. <PRE>BIN1=`ubprint -a bin1 -p hplaser`</PRE> </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-d debug</TD> <TD> This gives a debug output. As ubprint reads the Data Dictionary and screen format each line is echoed to the screen. In this way the exact point at which an error occurs can be observed and corrected. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-f font</TD> <TD> Print the file using font. The attribute string for font is output after initalising the printer and before printing the files. <P> e.g. <PRE>cat file | ubprint -f elite -p epson | lpr</PRE> </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-p printer</TD> <TD>This is the name of a printer file in the directory ‘/usr/lib/ub/printers’. If this argument is not given, ubprint uses the TERM environment variable. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>files</TD> <TD> files is a list of files to print. If files is omitted or ‘-‘ is encountered in the list of files, stdin is used as the file to print. </TD> </TR> </TABLE> </TD></TR> </TABLE> <P> <h2>DOT COMMANDS</h2> .SN variable The string for variable is sent immediately. <P> <h2>SEE ALSO</h2> printers(4) <P> <h2>SPECIAL ATTRIBUTES</h2> <PRE> INIT RESET LINES </PRE>

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubpr

NAME

ubpr – print files

SYNOPSIS

ubpr -[R T* b c l# m* n o# p r t# w# x* z] <files>

DESCRIPTION

ubpr is used to format text contained in file(s) for printing. It is similar to the Unix “pr” command but with different features.

The options may appear in any order, but must appear before the file name.

<P> <TABLE WIDTH=”100%” BGCOLOR=”#000000″> <CAPTION>COMMAND LINE OPTIONS</CAPTION> <TR><TD> <TABLE WIDTH=”100%” BGCOLOR=”#FFFFFF”> <TR> <TH>OPTION</TH> <TH>DESCRIPTION</TH> </TR> <TR> <TD>-R</TD> <TD> Raw processing. No output buffing is done. In this mode the last page is not padded to the page length. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-b</TD> <TD> “Binary” mode. Text is copied without interpretation. However lines are counted and the output is padded to output an exact page length on the last page. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-c</TD> <TD> Produces a table of contents displaying the starting line number and name of each module. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-I number</TD> <TD>’number’ is the page length in lines (default 66.)</TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-m module</TD> <TD>Print only the specified module from the file.</TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-n</TD> <TD>Do not provide line numbering.</TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-o offset</TD> <TD>Output is offset offset characters from left margin.</TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-p</TD> <TD>Reset page numbering on each module.</TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-r</TD> <TD>Add a carriage return (‘\r’) after each line.</TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-w width</TD> <TD> Set the width of a line to ‘width’ character positions. If a line is longer than the specified width, ++ is prepended to the next line followed by the remaining text of the current line. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-x file</TD> <TD> Extract module into file. The module given by -m will be extracted into the file file. </TD> </TR> <TR> <TD>-z</TD> <TD> Convert octal 200 (decimal 128, hex 80) to 0 on output. This is used to put nul characters in output. </TD> </TR> </TABLE> </TD></TR> </TABLE> <P> A text file printed with ubpr will normally have a header and a footer line with the file name, module name, date, time, and page number. Six blank lines are inserted between pages for perforation skipping; each line is numbered; and lines longer than 124 characters are wrapped to the next line with “++” as the line number. There are 4 characters allowed for the line numbers and a 4 character space to the start of the printed text. <P> A file may be split into modules by using a C comment in this form: <PRE>/*mo* module*/</PRE> <P> N.B. there is only one space just before the module name. <P> Each module will start at the top of a new page. <P> A page break can be inserted using the C comment /*pa*/. <P> Both the module and page break markers must start in column 1 to be recognised. <P> <h2>EXAMPLE</h2> To print a file with maximum 8O characters per line: <PRE>ubpr – w8O filename</PRE>

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubpasschk

NAME

ubpasschk – check password in/etc/shadow

SYNOPSIS

ubpasschk

DESCRIPTION

Ubpasschk is a utility supplied to support the password checking functions of UNIBASE programs.

On the original Unix systems, the user’s password was stored encrypted in the file /etc/passwd. As this file is generally readable it became easy to run password cracking programs against the encrypted passwords.

Improved security, particularly C2, has produced a variation to this. In many systems a separate file,/etc/shadow, holds the encrypted passwords. As this is not generally readable, user level programs can’t run password cracking programs against it. This has lead to a problem for UNIBASE security as it can’t read/etc/shadow either.

Ubpasschk is a “setuidroot” program that takes two lines of input user login id and unencrypted password. The password is encrypted and checked against the password in/etc/shadow.

As exit code of O indicates a valid password.

UNIBASE programs will automatically call this program when and if required.

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubnewdist

NAME

ubnewdist – make a new distribution of an application

SYNOPSIS

DESCRIPTION

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO

ubmv

NAME

ubmv – renames one UNIBASE table to another name

SYNOPSIS

ubmv table1 [table2..] target

DESCRIPTION

ubmv moves UNIBASE table (“.dat” and “.key” files) to a target name, table1 and target cannot be the same.

If target is not a directory, then only one table may be specified before it. If the target has its “.dat” and “.key” link to another file with links, the other links remain and “.dat” and “.key” of target become a new file.

If target is a directory, then the specified table(s) are moved to the target directory.

<P> <h2>EXAMPLE</h2> To move the “.dat” and “.key” files of the table “oldstock” to new table “newstock” <PRE>ubmv oldstock newstock</PRE> <h2>SEE ALSO</h2> mv(1) Unix Reference Manual

FLAGS

FLAG ARGUMENT TYPE DESCRIPTION

ERRORS

EXAMPLE

SEE ALSO